Dieting Trends

We take a look at the well establised trends in diets as well as look at what the latest diet fads around the corner are.

Atkins update:

Despite warnings about its safety and efficacy from the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute (INDI), Atkins remains a very popular diet. It has many followers and the range of low-carb foods and drinks continues to expand to meet the demand for new and interesting foods for Atkins dieters. Zero-carb soft drinks, low-carb confectionery bars, sugar-free toffee and gourmet chocolate are just a few of the new products that have become available this year. Most of these products are only available through Internet shops and can be expensive.

What is it?
Limits carbohydrate (CHO) intake to 20g per day for first two weeks to promote weight loss. CHO is then added back into the diet, 5g at a time, until weight loss levels off

Forbidden foods
No fruit, bread, pasta, nuts, seeds or grains allowed in first two weeks. They are gradually added back into the diet in the second phase

Advice on protein   
No

limit on the amount of protein rich foods, other than not to eat past the point of fullness. Protein sources such as tuna, salmon, turkey, chicken, beef, bacon, eggs, crabmeat and duck are advised.

Advice on fat
No limit on fat

South Beach and GI Diet update

The South Beach Diet and Living the GI Diet are two examples of popular diets based on the gylcaemic index (GI) of foods. The low-GI weight loss diet has been generally endorsed by health professionals such as dieticians and nutritionists. It is considered to be based on good science and, best of all, good sense.

In addition to its weight-loss claims, the South Beach Diet claims that you will lose weight without feeling hungry, that the diet will banish cravings, protect against diabetes and heart disease.

However, recent scientific studies and reviews of the evidence in support of these various claims have been contradictory. For example, two large scale studies found no association between GI and the risk of developing diabetes and studies into the association between GI and coronary heart disease have failed to provide clear results.

What is it?

Living the GI Die
Based on traffic light system of foods according to their GI. Low-GI foods are green, moderate-GI foods are orange and high-GI foods are red. Carbs such as bread, rice, pasta and potatoes are limited.

South Beach Diet
Divides foods into good carbs and bad carbs. Good carbs have a low-GI and bad carbs have a high-GI. It is high in wholegrain foods and warns against all processed food.

Forbidden foods  

Living the GI Die
No alcohol to begin with. Whole eggs, bagels and pancakes are not allowed and are on the red list.

South Beach Diet
Fruit, dairy, bread, pasta, rice, root vegetables and fatty meat are not allowed in the first two weeks but are reintroduced slowly after that.

Advice on protein

Living the GI Die
Low-fat protein sources such as beans, chicken, chickpeas, fish, turkey and shellfish are advised and the portion is restricted to 3-4 oz per serving.  

South Beach Diet
Favours most types of low-fat, protein rich foods such as chicken, turkey, tuna, feta, trout, prawn, crab, nuts and seeds from the start. Protein levels range from 9-22g per meal.

Advice on fat

Living the GI Die
Low-fat foods advised   

South Beach Diet
Favours low-fat varieties

The Coconut Diet – the next fad?

Perhaps we will be talking about the Coconut Diet this time next year when the current low GI fad passes. The coconut diet advises three tablespoons of coconut oil per day and has 100s of testimonials concerning it’s efficacy! The marketing blurb says ‘The Coconut Diet picks up where traditional diets fail’-who knows, it could be the next diet fad!!

Source: MedPages